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Discussion Starter #1
Alright you lot?!

Went to swap over my Peugeot 205 TSWs to my 1998 Civic, to find although they're both 4 stud, they don't fit.
Have been told its coz the offsets are different.

Any ideas of where would find out the offsets for my mota?

Might be a good idea to post a sticky with the offsets of the different civics, dunno, what ya think?
 

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they will never fit pugs are 4 x 108 and 4 stud hondas are 4 x 100 thats pcd

The offset of a vehicle's wheel is the distance between the centerline of the wheel and the plane of the hub-mounting surface of the wheel. It can thus be either positive or negative, and is typically measured in millimeters. Offset has a significant effect on many elements of a vehicle's suspension, including suspension geometry, clearance between the tyre and suspension elements, the scrub radius of the steering system, and visually, the width of the wheel faces relative to the car's bodywork.


Zero Offset - The plane of the hub mounting surface is even with the centerline of the wheel.
Positive Offset - The plane of the hub mounting surface is shifted from the centerline toward the front or outside of the wheel. Positive offset wheels are generally found on front wheel drive cars and newer rear drive cars.
Negative Offset - The plane of the hub mounting surface is toward the back or brake side of the wheel's centerline.


"Deep dish" wheels typically have negative offset or a very low positive offset.


To maintain handling characteristics and avoid undue loads on bushings and ball joints, the car manufacturer's original offset should be maintained when choosing new wheels unless there are overriding clearance issues.


Wheels are usually stamped with their offset using the German prefix "ET", meaning "Einpresstiefe" or, literally, "insertion depth". An example would be "ET45" for a 45mm offset.


Calculating the offset of a wheel is a fairly easy mathematical equation. First, measure the overall width of the wheel (remember, just because a wheel is 18x7.5, does not mean that the OVERALL width is 7.5”. It means that the measurement between the outboard flange and the inboard flange is 7.5”). Next, divide that width of the wheel by two; this will give you the centerline of the wheel.


Overall width/2 = Centerline


After determining the centerline, measure from the hub-mounting surface of the hub to the edge of the inboard flange (if the wheel were laying flat on the ground – face up – your measurement would be from the ground to the hub-mounting surface). This is your back spacing.


Centerline - Back spacing = Offset in Inches


Inches x 25.4 = Offset in mm
 

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wheel info

Bolt pattern
The bolt pattern is merely the number of bolts on the wheel. As the bolts will be evenly spaced, the number determines the bolt pattern.


Bolt circle

4 Hole Pattern
5 Hole PatternThe bolt circle is the circle determined by the positions of the bolts; the center of every bolt lies on the circumference of the bolt circle.

The important measurement is the "pitch circle diameter" (PCD), usually expressed in millimeters, although inches are sometimes used. For a 4- or 6-bolt car, this measurement is merely the distance between the center of two diametrically opposite bolts. In the 4-bolt picture below, this would be the distance between holes #1 and #4. Some basic geometry is needed to find the center of a 5-bolt pattern: draw a line between any two neighboring bolts, and draw a line from the midpoint of this line to the opposite bolt. Repeat with a different set of three bolts, and the two long lines will cross in the center, thereby making the distance between this intersection and the center of a bolt the radius of the bolt circle.

The PCD can be calculated for any wheel from the number of bolts (n) and the measured center distance between two adjacent bolts (d) as; PCD = d / SIN(?/n).

A 1974 MG B is a 4/4.5" (4/114.3) car, meaning it is, again, a 4-bolt pattern with a 4.5" or 114.3 mm bolt circle.

The most common PCD values are 100 mm and 114.3 mm. This difference arises from the manufacturers' measurement convention - whether they are designing around metric values (100 mm) or imperial values (4.5 inches, i.e. 114.3 mm).


Lug nuts or bolts
Another thing to consider when new wheels are purchased is proper lug nuts or bolts. They are usually either flat, tapered (generally at 90degrees), or ball seats, meaning the mounting surfaces are flat, tapered, or spherical respectively. For example, most Hondas have ball lug seats from the factory while most aftermarket wheels have a tapered lug design. If you buy aftermarket wheels for a Honda make sure you get the proper lug nuts for the wheel or the wheel will not be properly centered. Some manufacturers (e.g. Nissan) have used taper lug nuts for steel wheels and flat seated lug nuts for alloy wheels.

Some aftermarket wheels will only fit smaller lug nuts, or not allow an ordinary lug nut to be properly torqued down because a socket will not fit into the lug hole. Tuner lug nuts were created to solve the problem. Tuner lug nuts utilize a special key to allow removal and installation with standard lug wrench or socket. The design of tuner lug nuts can range from spline drive to multisided, and are sometimes lightweight for performance purposes. A variation is the "locking wheel nut", which is almost universally used for alloy wheels in the United Kingdom. One standard lug nut on each wheel is replaced with a nut which requires a special and unique key (typically a computer-designed, rounded star shape) to fit and remove the nut. This helps to discourage theft of wheels. However, universal removal tools are available which grip the head of the locking nut using a hardened left-hand thread. The success of these depends on whether there is room to use it in the lug hole, and whether the manufacturer has incorporated a free-spinning outer casing to the locking

Make sure to keep a set of lugs that fit your spare tyre.
Keep a key to aftermarket lug nuts and locking nuts in the car in case of a flat.

Offset
The offset, measured in millimeters, can be negative or positive, and is the distance from the hub-mounting surface to the rim's true centerline. A positive offset means the hub-mounting surface is closer to the outside edge of the wheel; a negative offset means the hub-mounting surface is closer to the inside edge of the wheel. Offset affects the scrub radius of the steering and it is advisable to stay within the limits allowed by the vehicle manufacturer. If tires are fitted which are significantly wider than those specified by the manufacturer, a compromise may have to be adopted whereby a wheel with less offset is used to prevent the tire rubbing on the suspension.

Wheel size

Measuring wheel diameterThe wheel size is the diameter of the wheel, in inches, not counting the tyre. A tyre designated as a "225/70R14" denotes a tyre with the following dimensions: cross section at widest part of tire (NOT tread width) 225 mm; ratio of tire height to width: 70 percent; rim diameter: 14". Therefore a 185/70R14 has the same rim diameter and aspect ratio, but a smaller overall diameter and narrower cross section than the 225/70R14. Tread width is a function of shoulder design so tyres with the same cross section may well have different tread widths.




Centerbore
The centerbore of a wheel is the size of the hole in the back of the wheel that centers it over the mounting hub of the car. Factory wheels have a centerbore that matches exactly with the hub to reduce vibration by keeping the wheel centered. Wheels with the correct centerbore to the car they will be mounted on are known as hubcentric. Hubcentric wheels take the stress off the lug nuts, reducing the job of the lug nuts to holding the wheel to the car. Wheels that are not hubcentric are known as lugcentric, as the job of centering is done by the lug nuts assuming they are properly torqued down. Centerbore on aftermarket wheels must be equal to or greater than that of the hub or the wheel cannot be mounted on the car. Many aftermarket wheels come with "hubcentric rings" that lock into the back of the wheel to adapt a wheel with a larger centerbore to a smaller hub. These adapters are usually made of plastic but also in aluminium.
 

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exactly ! but i thought the info would be usefull for people wanting some info on wheels and offset so they can get there wheels sitting just right in there arches , not everyone is happy with the standard sort of et35 when you could go less and get the wheels sitting nicer in the arches .
some wheel manufacturers let you choose the offsets , then you can get it perfect , not just close .
 
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