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Discussion Starter #1
Hi im looking for some one who can do a customer remap for my car, every i go they only do Deisels and some that do remaping want to charge me £300 at thor racing but had my mate telling me they not very good as they messed up his. if anyone knows where a good place to start that be great
 

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most honda ecu's arent remappable. you will need to find a standalone unit which hondata manufacture. they do a standard unit s100 which covers most stuff but needs to be mapped in a special place.
s200 adds extra features
s300 is the top level, it is possible to plug a laptop in and change settings on the fly/parked up.
 

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OBD1 ecu's are chippable, these are between 92-95.

it is possible to buy a harness which will allow you to adapt an OBD0 or OBD2 car to and OBD1 ecu.

what mods do you have?

what are you planning on in the future?
 

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yea it's found in pre 1992 models like the ef, it is chippable but can only be chipped with software called turboedit, and you have no chance in hell of finding a UK turner who tunes with that (but please enlighten me if you know someone lol)

thats the reason most people will swap to OBD1 where you have crome, neptune, eCtune, uberdata which you can chip with.

i can put up some info on the software if people are interested in what the yanks are doing, but it's finding someone in the UK who uses it thats hard.
 

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now if you like to look at the bullet point stating fuel control you will notice its controllered using OBD0.

D16A6
Also known as D16Z2.

Found in:
1988-1991 Honda Civic Si, CRX Si, Civic Wagon RT4WD
1990-1991 Honda Civic EX Sedan
1988-1995 Honda Civic Shuttle RT4WD (UK/Europe/Asia/AU/NZ)
1989-1996 Rover 216/416 GSi (UK/Europe)
Displacement : 1590 cm³
Bore and Stroke : 75 mm X 90 mm
Compression : 9.1:1
Power : 115 hp (86 kW) @ 5600 rpm & 100 ft·lbf @ 3,800 rpm, redline 7200 rpm (USA)
Note: 1988 engines were 105 hp (78 kW), MY89-91 hp was increased to 108
Valvetrain : SOHC
Fuel Control : OBD-0 four-point PGM-FI
Head Code : PM3
Piston Code : PM6

D16A8
Found in:
1988-1995 Civic/CRX/Concerto (UK/Europe/Australia)
1990-1995 Rover 216/416 GTi(UK/Europe)
1990-1995 Rover 216 Coupe (Europe)
Displacement : 1590 cm³
Bore and Stroke : 75 mm X 90 mm
Compression : 9.5:1
Power : 122 hp (91 kW) @ 6800 rpm & 108 ft·lbf @ 5900 rpm
Valvetrain : DOHC
Fuel Control : OBD-0 MPFI
ECU Code: PP5

[edit] D16A9
(Same as D16A8 but without a catalytic converter)

Found in:
1988-1991 Concerto (UK/Europe)
1988-1991 CRX 1.6i-16(UK/Europe/South Africa)
1988-1991 Civic 1.6i-16(UK/Europe/South Africa)
1989-1996 Rover 216/416 GTi (UK/Europe)
1992-1995 Civic Si (Peruvian version)
Displacement : 1590 cm³
Bore and Stroke : 75 mm X 90 mm
Compression : 9.5:1
Power : 130hp @ 6.800 rpm & 108 ft·lbf @ 5.900 rpm
Valvetrain : DOHC 16v
Redline: 7.200RPM
Limit: 7.500RPM
Fuel Control : OBD-0 MPFI (92-95 OBD-1)
ECU Code: PM7 (92-95 P29)
GearBox : L3 Cable type (92- 95 S20

where as my engine.

D16Z6
Found in
1991-1992 Honda civic si
1992-1995 Honda Civic EX, EX-V and SI
1992-1995 Honda Civic ESi (European Market)
1993-1995 Honda Del Sol Si (only USDM)
1993-1995 Honda Del Sol ESi (European)
Displacement : 1590 cm³
Bore and Stroke : 75 mm X 90 mm
Compression : 9.2:1
Power : 125 hp (93 kW) @ 6600 rpm & 106 ft·lbf @ 5200 rpm
Redline : 7300 rpm
Fuel Cut : 7411 rpm
Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC
Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
Head Code : P08
ECU Code : P28

is OBD1.
 

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OBD = ON BOARD DIAGNOSTICS

"OBD" is a national standard. this is why all 96 cars can be read with an OBDII scan tool. OBD1 isnt as standardized and many manufacturers have different plugs for their model specific readers and such. "OBD0" which is actually non-OBD, is the least advanced and non standardized so effectively there is no such thing as a national standard OBD0 its fictional or made up by honda.

the following is standard:



OBD-I
The regulatory intent of OBD-I was to encourage auto manufacturers to design reliable emission control systems that remain effective for the vehicle's "useful life". The hope was that by forcing annual emissions testing for California, and denying registration to vehicles that did not pass, drivers would tend to purchase vehicles that would more reliably pass the test. Along these lines, OBD-I was largely unsuccessful—the means of reporting emissions-specific diagnostic information was not standardized. Technical difficulties with obtaining standardized and reliable emissions information from all vehicles led to an inability to implement effectively the annual testing program.


OBD 1.5
OBD 1.5 refers to a partial implementation of OBD-II which GM used on some vehicles in 1994 and 1995 (GM did not use the term OBD 1.5 in the documentation for these vehicles - they simply have an OBD and an OBD-II section in the service manual.)

For example, the 94-95 Corvettes have one post-cat oxygen sensor (although they have two catalytic converters), and have a subset of the OBD-II codes implemented. For a 1994 Corvette the implemented OBD-II codes are P0116-P0118, P0131-P0135, P0151-P0155, P0158, P0160-P0161, P0171-P0175, P0420, P1114-P1115, P1133, P1153 and P1158.[1]

This hybrid system was present on the H-body cars in 94-95, W-body cars (Buick Regal,Chevrolet Lumina('95 only),Chevrolet Monte Carlo('95 only),Pontiac Grand Prix, Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme) in 94-95, L-body (Chevrolet Beretta / Chevrolet Corsica) in 94-95, Y-body (Chevrolet Corvette) in 94-95, on the F-body (Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird) in 95 and on the J-Body (Chevrolet Cavalier and Pontiac Sunfire) and N-Body (Buick Skylark, Oldsmobile Achieva, Pontiac Grand Am) in 95.

Depending on the year and the vehicle, a car with the OBD 1.5 system may have either the older OBD-I connector, or the newer OBD-II connector, but they are electrically identical to each other.[citation needed]

The pinout for the ALDL connection on these cars is as follows:


Female OBD connector pinout1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

For ALDL connections, pin 9 is the data stream, pins 4 and 5 are ground and pin 16 is battery voltage.

Additional vehicle-specific diagnostic and control circuits are also available on this connector. For instance, on the Corvette there are interfaces for the Class 2 serial data stream from the PCM, the CCM diagnostic terminal, the radio data stream, the airbag system, the selective ride control system, the low tire pressure warning system and the passive keyless entry system.

An OBD1.5 has also been used on Mitsubishi cars of '95 '97 vintage.

An OBD1.5 has been used in some 1995 Volkswagen VR6's.

OBD-II
OBD-II is an improvement over OBD-I in both capability and standardization. The OBD-II standard specifies the type of diagnostic connector and its pinout, the electrical signalling protocols available, and the messaging format. It also provides a candidate list of vehicle parameters to monitor along with how to encode the data for each. Finally, the OBD-II standard provides an extensible list of DTCs. As a result of this standardization, a single device can query the on-board computer(s) in any vehicle. This OBD-II came in 2 models OBD-IIA and OBD-IIB.


OBD-II Diagnostic connector

ConnectorThe OBD-II specification provides for a standardized hardware interface—the female 16-pin (2x8) J1962 connector. Unlike the OBD-I connector, which was sometimes found under the hood of the vehicle, the OBD-II connector is nearly always located on the driver's side of the passenger compartment near the center console or around the steering wheel.

hope that clears the myth up :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the info guys, there is a OBD0 you find that on the Ef, well i have manage to sort my ECU out i have the harness, and the P28 OBD1 ecu which is being remaped i hadd to buy this from Miami though lol. but i keep you guys posted on this ecu i ordered.
 

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im ordering my from the states.

if you said you where importing i would have reccomended http://www.xenocron.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

where did you get it from?

is it having a basemap installed in miami?

what mods do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi mate i tried that link you sent me, doesn't work :(. at the moment i have a carbon fibre intake pipe with blitz air filter, i have a 4 2 manifold stright through exhuast with high flow decat. i also have performance leads and a new clutch and light flywheel.
 

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clinchy said:
but as stated honda still use the term OBD0 to refer to thier earlier system.

yea technically it is a version of OBD1 but the majority of people refer to it as OBD0.

hense the reason products like this exist

http://www.boomslang.us/obd0to1.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
obd0 isnt obd1 "OBD0" which is actually non-OBD, is the least advanced and non standardized so effectively there is no such thing as a national standard OBD0 its fictional or made up by honda.
why wont you except this mate ITS NOT OBD AT ALL its hondas myth and just because they say its obd0 doesnt all of a sudden make it a recognised thing or national standard all of a sudden, they are the only manufacturers who have dreamed this fictional thing up .aaaaaaaaaaaaaghhh
 

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so you would refer to it as just non-OBD or OBD?

i just personally dont see the harm in refering to it as ODB0, seeming how this is the more widely used term surely it would make it easier to find info a particular subject?

do you have any more literature on it?
 
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