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Hi all,

After some extensive searching I've have been struggling to find any suspension upgrades, and very little else for that matter, for the mk9 Civic. I guess this car just isn't that popular among enthusiasts, which is a pity as it's such a good looking car IMHO (rear lights notwithstanding, definitely marmite syndrome there).

I did find a Bilstein 30mm lowering kit with uprated shocks which has now been fitted, it's definitely made an improvement but there's still a 'rebound' effect at the rear after sharp steering inputs. I was hoping to find an uprated anti-roll bar, but alas no-one seems to make one except maybe Progress Auto in the U.S...

It seems very expensive, does anyone know if this would fit a mk9 i-dtec or know of any other options/products to improve the handling of this car?

Posts about the mk9 don't seem to get many replies on here, here's hoping someone can help me out!

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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1) For road use a stiffer rear anti-sway set up can reduce rather than improve handling. The PhD engineers who design suspension systems rarely treat a single component in isolation. Bumps and pot holes that aren't prevalent on race tracks are found in abundance on British roads and an overly stiff rear anti sway system can set the car bouncing and tramping over these, particularly mid corner where there's weight transference. I've had several vehicles where the rear anti sway is adjustable - the manufacturer recommended a soft set up for road use. Fixed (non adjustable) firmer anti sway systems are generally designed to be used with stiffer spring systems. Stiffer spring systems can bring benefits on the track and disbenefits on the road. There's a big difference between the rear and front of a car. The front will experience weight transference on to it under decelleration, braking and cornering. Hence the common use of anti roll bars and these being 'beefed up' on sports models. The rear of the car will experience weight transference from it onto the front during the conditions just described.
2) The major component controlling rebound is the shock absorber
 
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