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My "ultra reliable" 2018 1 litre Civic has now been off the road for approximately 4 weeks, after it stopped running for no apparent reason. After the dealership investigation it seems that the crank shaft bearing failed causing the engine to seize up. I now have Honda disputing the warranty claim as the car is over 2 years old, the extended warranty company is also disputing this as they believe the fault is Honda's.

My question is are these 1 litre Hondas actually OK? About 4 months ago the alternator failed on this same car - which was supposed to cost £1100 to repair - not under warranty again - but very graciously they ended up offering this for £700. Then I coughed up for the extended warranty - which so far seems to have been a waste of money as well.

Our family have 4 Hondas - all of which are great but this 1 litre Civic is atrocious. Am I just unlucky or is this 1 litre Civic just a disaster waiting to happen - and its now happened to me?
 

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£1100 - for an alternator repair? Seriously? £700 for an alternator repair? Were you provided with a parts and labour break out for that?
 

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My "ultra reliable" 2018 1 litre Civic has now been off the road for approximately 4 weeks, after it stopped running for no apparent reason. After the dealership investigation it seems that the crank shaft bearing failed causing the engine to seize up. I now have Honda disputing the warranty claim as the car is over 2 years old, the extended warranty company is also disputing this as they believe the fault is Honda's.

My question is are these 1 litre Hondas actually OK? About 4 months ago the alternator failed on this same car - which was supposed to cost £1100 to repair - not under warranty again - but very graciously they ended up offering this for £700. Then I coughed up for the extended warranty - which so far seems to have been a waste of money as well.

Our family have 4 Hondas - all of which are great but this 1 litre Civic is atrocious. Am I just unlucky or is this 1 litre Civic just a disaster waiting to happen - and its now happened to me?
 

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I will never buy another Honda, I have the civic 1ltr eco boost, it’s the 2018 model, and what they don’t tell u is at 750000 miles the (wet belt) cam belt needs to be replaced, instead of using a metal one they use rubber ones and as this wears away it flicks rubber and oil muck into your engine, which results in the turbo blowing and then needing a full engine refit all for a nice price of around £16k, I now have a Honda that does not go that I still have to pay for and they have noted on there forum that this is something they are investigating but are still refusing to help absolute joke Iv had a few hondas and all been great but this one not worth the money at all and I’m appalled by there refusal to help 🤬
 

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I will never buy another Honda, I have the civic 1ltr eco boost, it’s the 2018 model, and what they don’t tell u is at 750000 miles the (wet belt) cam belt needs to be replaced, instead of using a metal one they use rubber ones and as this wears away it flicks rubber and oil muck into your engine, which results in the turbo blowing and then needing a full engine refit all for a nice price of around £16k, I now have a Honda that does not go that I still have to pay for and they have noted on there forum that this is something they are investigating but are still refusing to help absolute joke Iv had a few hondas and all been great but this one not worth the money at all and I’m appalled by there refusal to help 🤬
Horrific pricing!

I don’t know the engine concerned, but I’m going to make some assumptions.

Assumption 1) is that the ‘wet belt’ is running off the crank and the pulley is sitting in the oil sump 2) oil is being drawn from the sump and is then fed under pressure to (a) the main bearings (b) the cam shaft(s) (c) the turbo. (d) anything else that might require a high pressure oil feed.



Oil to the turbo can be used to both cool it and provide lubrication to the turbo bearings, or just to provide lubrication, with cooling being supplied by water. At one point I assembled huge turbo diesel engines for use in large equipment. I also worked in the manufacturer’s repair bay. Any obstruction in the turbo oil feed would cause catastrophic failure. When that happens the turbo blades are typically what fail – they overheat, melt and get blown down the inlet manifold and sucked into the engine. Or if the bearings fail through lack of oil the bearings seize and parts of the blades crack through heat and pressure. In both scenarios it is possible for damage to be caused to catalytic converters too – if the exhaust side blade rotor fails (typically the input side goes before this and the engine ‘conks out’ because it’s not getting the air input it’s designed to run on).



So the engine needs to be stripped, the head needs to come off and the bores need to be examined for damage and, at minimum, the area above the piston top ring blown out with high pressure air. The head also needs to come apart and every valve seat and valve needs examining for damage. Typically there isn’t any damage to the valve seats and valves, because the seating areas are hardened, but if there is, then it may require a replacement head or some new valves. All the ports and manifolds need blowing out – everything ‘downstream’ of the turbo. The spark plugs will require inspection and maybe replacement too. So it is a big job.



But what puzzles me in this, is an oil feed failure. If Honda are using a typical return line filtration system, this relies on the oil in the sump being clean. Putting something in that sump that is going to degrade tiny particles of rubber into the erstwhile clean oil is a design failure. If they are using a less common feed line filtration system, then designed in should have been enough filter area capacity to allow the outer filter elements to function and provide full oil flow to the engine with any calculated belt degradation factored in. If the filter surface filled with rubber particles, it would diminish the oil flow. Picking up unfiltered oil with rubber particles would spread them through the oil feed routes. That would cause an oil feed diminution to all areas. But typically the turbo would be the first thing to go, especially if it was oil cooled. It is a high stress component and the oil feeds are never huge.



There could be damage elsewhere in your engine. Was the belt a service item listed in the user manual for a 75,000 miles (or 750,000) change? Had that service been done at 75,000 miles? Or not yet reached? If so (or if it’s not listed) I might be reaching for my solicitor or, if you have AA/RAC membership or anything like that, talking to them.



If you are in some way ‘at fault’ you may wish to think about getting a quote from an engine rebuild specialist – that offers a warranty. Some of them will pick up your car and do the whole job. And I’d be amazed if it cost £16k. And a quick look on the very large UK car sales site says £16k is more than your car is worth.
 
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